Band Baaja Baarat! - Check out new Wedding trends

The wedding industry in India was estimated to be worth US$50 billion in 2019, according to a report by KPMG. The estimated growth rate was 25-30% per year, making it one of the country’s most important industries. It includes multiple verticals that provide employment and ensure the livelihood of lakhs of people, too. But the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent social distancing measures have brought the entire industry to a near-standstill. Over the past few months, thousands of weddings have been cancelled, disappointing eager couples and taking away the jobs of many who work in the wedding industry. Still, there have been some who’ve fought their way through and retained the essence of romance, by saying “I do” on rooftops and in homes, with only immediate family in attendance.

Recasting the idea of the Big Fat Indian Wedding – with guest lists running into thousands, and lakhs of rupees being spent on multiple functions and elaborate clothes – couples have been forced to go back to the basics for the most important day of their lives. With ample precautions in place and guest lists that do not exceed 50 people, some weddings have happened recently. To understand the scenario better, we spoke to some people who work behind the scenes to put weddings together. Here’s more on how they’re coping with the crisis, and adapting their businesses during the pandemic.  

- Anahita 


Minttu Sarna

Minttu Sarna

Known for his meticulous decor and larger-than-life grandeur is Minttu Sarna, a well-known wedding and event planner in the city. His ultimate high is to see people’s dreams being executed, and the attention to detail is what makes him a favourite of so many couples. Here’s what this talented man has to say about his current work scenario. 

With a decrease in the number of people allowed to attend an event, does it take away from the grandeur?
I don’t think so. Grandeur is a reflection of your personality and numbers don’t play a role there. You could have an intimate wedding with similar style and pomp.

From the decor angle, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
It’s the need of the hour to be safe first. Secondly, change is a part of nature, and hence must get accustomed to it. It’s going to be an intimate affair for all the couples wanting to get married this season. But rest assured that as times change, things will be back to normal. People have started enjoying the intimacy in the weddings with their loved ones around, which can be missing otherwise with large numbers.

Minttu Sarna

Do you prefer these smaller affairs?
As easy as the small weddings are, with social distancing and other precautionary measures being taken care of, we are fully capable of doing larger weddings. One doesn’t realise that there are a lot of people dependent on this industry, and hence we need bigger ones. 

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with the pricing?
Quality comes with a cost, and so do we. But of course, since the numbers are fewer, the pricing also has come down. The current need of the hour is cost-effective weddings, and that’s what we’re catering to. 

What protective measures are you taking?
We have a key person in the team to monitor government guidance on COVID-19. We plan to design event spaces and timings to reduce crowd densities – arrival and departure areas; think about staggering arrival/departure times; how to minimise congestion; avoid peak times on public transport; and where to possibly implement options for virtual (or partly virtual) participation.
Risk mitigation measures are taken into consideration, which is more protective and involves separating people from each other and limiting access to shared surfaces through physical distancing and barriers. We also prohibit communal food services, with our attendees wearing masks all the time.

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season?  
We are pretty booked for the upcoming wedding season, based on the available muhurat days.


Meher Aria

Meher Aria

Meher Aria, Founder and CEO of Star Ventures, has been an event stylist for the last 22 years. With the aim to create memories that last a lifetime, this lady’s buzzwords in life are passion, exuberance and commitment. Her personal touch is evident at every event, she’s one of the best in the city and is known for being approachable and always available.

With a sharp reduction in the number of people allowed to attend an event, does it take away from the grandeur?
I have always believed that it’s not just about the numbers. An event can be beautifully designed and a venue made to look just as grand, irrespective of the number of people in attendance. In fact, when the numbers are small, one can pay a lot more attention to detail and make each guest feel truly special.

What changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
The current scenario has most definitely changed the way weddings are perceived and planned. To begin with, the uncertainty in the current situation no longer allows us to plan like we used to. Months of meticulous and detailed planning no longer works. We have to be ready to come up with ideas and then coordinate and execute them at short notice.

Meher Aria

Budgets have most certainly taken a beating. The mindset now is, “it does not make sense to spend the way one used to when we had the pleasure of inviting hundreds of guests”. So the huge convention centre setups, the elaborate sets, the imported flowers, the ‘100 items’ buffet and the finest in Bollywood song and dance makes way for a softer, more stylish and intimate wedding.

Do you think this trend of smaller affairs should stay?
NO! I absolutely love the big fat wedding with all its contraptions, in all its glory. And trust me when I say this – I do speak for most Indians. Not to mention the dilemma that the hosts find themselves in: who to invite and who to avoid? All of us know that in India, weddings are not just a family and friends affair. Hence the cap on numbers is quite the cause for concern.

You mentioned the budgets taking a beating…
Yes! The price point at the moment is quite an issue. When a client approaches us with a curtailed budget but still wants the design and decor to be grand, it does become challenging. Moreover, I am one of those whose expectations from myself have always been very high, irrespective of the budget. In a scenario like this, creativity, aesthetics and ‘the less is more’ approach works well.

Meher Aria

How safe do you feel getting out to work?
On a personal note, being at home for the last couple of months, not being able to do what I thrive on and love has been rather daunting. So it really feels nice to be back in the scheme of things, albeit a tad slow and one step at a time.

Having said that, keeping oneself and the team safe with all precautions in place is the way forward. Coronavirusis, unfortunately, here to stay for awhile, and we all must learn to work around it with a sense of utmost caution.


Sindhu Rao Vemula, Tanya Gupta and Aarti Kumar

Sindhu-Rao-Vemula-Tanya-Gupta-Aarti-Kumar

For Wedding planners at The Pink Circus, it’s always about the client and their vision. Started by Aarti Kumar, Tanya Gupta Viccajee and Sindhu Rao Vemula, this company works towards making the vision of the bride and groom possible – beautifully and memorably. With weddings becoming smaller, they’ve shifted from making many people very happy to making every participant feel very special… 

With the reduction in the number of people allowed to attend, does it take away from the grandeur? 
It doesn’t at all. The current situation gives us a chance to get into more detailing and personalisation, making every guest feel super special.

How do you plan to balance aesthetics with grandeur?
Aesthetics and grandeur should never be at war with one another. Grandeur isn’t a compromise of aesthetics. In fact, mere grandeur without aesthetics can get garish. Whatever be the size, aesthetics play the most important role, and that’s not going to change.

Sindhu-Rao-Vemula-Tanya-Gupta-Aarti-Kumar

As wedding planners, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
It’s going to be tough for relatives and friends to attend a wedding in a different city due to the travel restrictions in place at the moment. Destination weddings will definitely have to wait.

Is it easier working smaller groups?
For decor, the process is the same, whether there are 200 people or 1,000. Starting with the design, all the way up to execution. The primary reduction is the numbers of tables and chairs. Logistics will become a lot easier since there isn’t going to be travel and hotel stay, for the moment.

Do you think smaller affairs should stay?
Both have their pluses. Smaller weddings, home weddings, intimate weddings have their charm. On your big day, being surrounded by people who touched your heart at some point in your life is very special.

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with the pricing?
It depends on the kind of wedding the couple wants. The numbers might reduce but the grandeur might not. In that situation the pricing won’t reduce by a lot. But if someone wants a simple wedding, it definitely will bring down the pricing. 

Sindhu-Rao-Vemula-Tanya-Gupta-Aarti-Kumar

How safe do you feel, getting out to work?
Well, our teams are cautious. We’ve been taking all the necessary precautions, be it sanitisation, masks, gloves, reducing the amount of labour per team, be it florists, tenting and structures, draping, etc.

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season? 
Surprisingly, we have quite a few weddings in the pipeline. We’ve been working on different concepts through the lockdown – cannot wait to start executing them!

What do you think the future will be like for your industry if the virus is still around?
I guess COVID-19 is here to stay and we have to learn to live with it, at least for a year. Smaller weddings, intimate gatherings, protective measures; if we have it all in place, we are good to go.


Shankar Krishnamurthy

Shankar Krishnamurthy

Shankar Krishnamurthy, Hyderabad’s most celebrated chef-turned-restaurateur, has introduced the city to names like Fusion 9, Deli 9, Deli 9 Bistro, Siaa, Spoil, Uberdeq, Fusion 9 Inorbit, Grill Room, and Cinnabar Redd. While Shankar manages the entire business, his wife Maya takes care of the aesthetics of it all. We spoke to this veteran of the food and catering industry, who has close to 30 years of rich and varied international experience.

In the catering space, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
Everything is government-regulated; neither the clients nor the operators have a choice here. All of us have to abide by it, and we are trying to work around it. Extreme precautions are being taken, with processes getting a different look. As a chef, I find that working like this is no fun. We saw how Australia recently increased its allowed numbers, and I hope India increases them from just 50 soon, too.

Is it easier working with smaller groups?
Anything small is always nicer as it’s more focused, and hence the end product is superior.  

Shankar Krishnamurthy

Do you think smaller affairs should stay?
As of now, the mood is that as we have no choice. But smaller affairs are a thought process – people have had small weddings earlier, too. It is the other segment of those who like larger gatherings, who’re forced to follow the law. 

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with the pricing?
Pricing depends on the menu, and now there is an additional cost for the sanitising process. But from where I see it, in the next six months, the market will inflate, and things will get more expensive. For example, when people want a special team, and if we have to bring them in, keeping the 14-day quarantine and rules in mind, it’ll be a two-week process. Which means the client will need to pay extra. Hence for that type of experience, things will get more expensive. 

Shankar Krishnamurthy

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season? 
We have very few inquiries for the next few months. Whatever we have are in August and November, and that too, on the same dates. We had some bookings before the pandemic, but we’re not sure if that’s going to happen. Everyone is waiting and watching, as no one knows what tomorrow has in store. 

Do you have any scanning criteria while selecting clients?
The queries we have right now are all from known people, and we’re very clear about our protocols with the distance, buffet handling and reduced touch points. 


Manish and Jai Baldev

Varsha and Pankaj Baldev, along with Manish Baldev, founded Hira Panna over two decades ago, and were then joined by Jai Baldev. What started as supplying snacks and sandwiches for parties, eventually became a full-fledged catering service offering regional Indian and multinational cuisines. We caught up with them to get their input on the current wedding scene.

In the catering space, what changes do you see in the current wedding scenario?
Over the past couple of months, we have noticed that people have either delayed, or are having a small get-together with a compact menu. And some have given us a tentative date for the larger celebration that they’re planning later in the year. Some guests are also opting for the food to be prepared and delivered to their homes, and take care of the service themselves. 

Is it easier working with smaller groups?
Working with small groups is definitely new for us, and comes with its challenges. Having said that, we are trying to get accustomed to it, since this trend will stick around for a few months.

Do you think smaller affairs should stay?
We are definitely not over the moon about this new trend.But trying times like these call for changes to be made, and that’s what we have done.

Manish and Jai Baldev

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with pricing?
Pricing varies greatly and is dependent on the clients’ budgets and how elaborate they want their menu to be. While the scale may have changed in terms of there being fewer people at an event, clients are looking at more unique food options, to charm their selected guests.

What protective measures are you taking?
More frequent sanitation of our premises, glassware, and service equipment, with all the necessary guidelines and safety precautions being strictly adhered to. More frequent sanitation of the vehicles that are used to transport our material and food. Regular temperature checks of all the staff and equipping all staff with gloves, face shields, hand sanitisers, etc. 

What do you think the future will be like for your industry if the virus is still around?
In all likelihood, our immunity is going to be strong enough to fight this soon. Therefore, I do not see any far-reaching or long-term consequences of this virus. This seems to be a temporary disruption, and I am sure things will bounce back in the months to come.


Rajesh and Siddharth Agarwal

Rajesh-Siddharth-Agarwal

Located in Gachibowli, The Address Conventions and Exhibition has been made with a lot of planning. Owners Rajesh and Siddharth Agarwal have tried to cover almost every aspect that is required for a good convention centre – from the catwalk, fire fighting system, acoustic system, partition walls, safety and security systems. With their primary focus being the safety of their guests, this convention hall offers you multiple event spaces that you can choose as per your needs and demands. 

As a convention centre, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene and bookings?
The number of bookings have not been like other years, for obvious reasons. But as far as the decor and food is concerned, it’s been the same as we never come in the picture. It’s only the organiser who comes in contact with us for booking the hall.

Do you think this trend should stay?
I think this is a temporary phase. India is a country where people like a celebration. I feel once we come out of Covid-19 and are over it, we will have gatherings and festivities on an even larger scale than it used to be.

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with the pricing?
Frankly, our convention centre has been built in such a way that it can cater from a 100-person gathering to a 3,000 floating member gathering. So right from the beginning, we have a fixed price for 10,000, 20,000, 30,000 and 40,000 square feet halls.

How safe do you feel, getting out to work?
The current scenario is terrifying. With this virus, it’s tough to determine if the people you are working with are infected or not. Though we are taking the precautionary measures, at the back of our mind, the fear is always there.

What protective gear are you and your team wearing, and how comfortable are you with it while working?
We are all using N95 masks and disposable powdered hand gloves. We also conduct regular temperature checks for everyone coming in. As far as comfort is concerned, no one is! But since no one is aware of the movement of this virus, we have no choice. 

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season? 
We have a lot of queries, and people do want to close on the dates. But unless we have clear guidelines issued stating how to go about things, we aren’t taking any bookings.

Keeping safety in mind, have you reduced the number of weddings you’d otherwise take on?
We surely aren’t looking out for any weddings or events till August.


Sandy

Known for his elegant, soft and classy style, makeup artist Sandy is one of the city’s best-known wedding artists. Believing that ‘less is more’, this talented young man’s USP is how he accentuates the eyes. With a very minimal approach, this is what Sandy has to say about how his work being affected by the pandemic.

As a makeup artist, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
The only change I see is the number of people attending the wedding. Otherwise, everyone’s doing all sorts of wedding events. That’s the beauty of weddings, anyway, right?!

Is it easier working with smaller groups?
I need not work with a large number of people, since I only deal with the bride. Or maybe the maximum I allow are the bride’s sisters or the mother. They’re the only ones I have to closely work with. So not much has changed in that way. 

Do you think this trend should stay?
It depends on what people prefer. On a personal note, the trend of fewer people attending a wedding is not only safer but also more simple and classy. There’s more of a personal touch to these weddings, don’t you think?

How safe do you feel, getting out to work?
I think we have to adapt with the new normalcy along with the precautions, like sanitising and cleansing the brushes with alcohol, which we do before we put makeup on anyone. As I don’t deal with many people, I feel safe. I recently did a wedding at the Taj Falaknuma, and before entering the premises, they asked us to follow the protocol, which included a medical certificate from a doctor stating that I’m healthy to carry on with my work, etc. As long as I am good with the medical conditions, I’m safe. I also expect the other people to be safe, since everyone is responsible for their own health conditions as of now.

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season? 
I’m already booked for the following months of August and December.

Have the number of brides reduced?
I guess people have reduced the number of weddings in general. Most of the weddings have been postponed. Since there are fewer weddings happening, there are, naturally, fewer appointments compared to earlier. 


Gazal Surana

Gazal Surana

Like for most of us, for makeup artist Gazal Surana, working during this pandemic has been a bit scary. But it was during this lockdown that she realised how much she loved what she does. And so she’s bounced back to work, despite the fear in the air. Known for enhancing one’s natural features, while adding tons of glamour, here’s what this PYT has to say about her current work. 

What changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
Weddings are now more intimate, with a maximum of 50 people. The structure of weddings is also changing; some weddings are ensuring that masks are compulsory. There is also so much tension! People are not social anymore, so the atmosphere is very different. The weddings that I have been to, there was no buffet service. People were made to sit at distance and were served. 

Is it easier working with smaller groups?
My team size is the same, but I’m ensuring that all my assistants wear the right PPE gear.

Do you think this trend should stay?
Smaller gatherings and social distancing instead of big fat weddings? Personally I hope neither of these are here to stay! 

How safe do you feel, getting out to work?
It is quite a challenge to be honest, but I ensure that I have the right protective gear to keep me safe. It definitely is a risk!

What protective gear do you wear and how comfortable are you with it while working?
I wear a mask, glasses and face shield. I did try wearing a full PPE suit, but I didn’t understand its significance for us. But I have huge respect for doctors that wear it for hours on their shifts.

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season? 
August is looking like a good month; I just hope that by then the curve starts flattening. I think people are just waiting for that to happen so they can start planning their weddings. 

With safety in mind, have you reduced the number of brides you’d otherwise take on?
Definitely, it has happened quite organically. For example, I am not taking up weddings thatare happening at any faraway locations. There were times that I would do quite a few brides in a day, but right now I’m taking only one.


Priya Maganti

Priya-Maganti

CEO of RVR Pro, Priya Maganti and her team have shot quite a few weddings during the pandemic. They’ve captured weddings that had two lakh guests, and now there are smaller affairs with just 20 people. Working to see happy faces of brides and grooms on their post-production monitors, Priya finds this field of work addictive.  

As a photographer, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
Apart from our regular planning sessions, we had virtual meetings about what measures we’d need to follow. We have noticed changes right from entering the venues; the venue management made sure thermal checks are done not just to the guests, but for the bride and groom too, where earlier they’d receive welcome flowers. Now, couple portraits with them wearing their designer/matching masks are the new ‘in’ photos. They can show them off someday to their grandkids, showing how their love stood and won against time and the coronavirus! Even the priests are more careful with their masks on.

Is it easier working with smaller groups?
Weddings are all about fun, and it only gets merrier with more people. So there’s a compromise on all that fun since it’s now a more intimate affair. But now that it’s smaller, we get more romantic candids and portraits thanks to all the privacy the couple gets.

Do you think this trend should stay?
Weddings with gatherings from 500-1000 are more fun, especially with the family support system that we have here. It only gets merrier when the guest list is filled with your cousins and buddies. 

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with the pricing?
With quarantine weddings, the scales have come down by the size of the audience, not by the duration of the event. A Hindu wedding continues to be that normal 4-6 hours, even when done with 20 guests. So our capturing remains the same. Yes, we might not need that extra team member capturing the crowd now, and the drones, cranes and LED screens are also a miss in the weddings now. But the effort is the same. 

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season? 
We are seeing a hike in the queries compared to the lockdown months, as people are accepting the fact that we have to live with coronavirus around.

In terms of safety, have you reduced the number of weddings you’d otherwise take on?
Yes, we had a few events that we had to give up so as to ensure our team members’ safety.

What is your personal sentiment about working like this?
Money comes and goes. If not today, we will make it big some other day. I am not ready to bet on my teammates’ safety by taking up events that I am not confident about.


Photriya Venky

Photriya Venky

Having worked more than1,800 weddings over the past 18 years, Photriya Venky is well-known for his candid pictures and the emotions that he captures perfectly in them. His only aim is to satisfy his clientsand create remarkable stories for them. His success lies in knowing his clients’ requirements and always exceeding their expectations.

As a wedding photographer, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
With life in the ‘New Normal’ and functions with 50 people, crowds at weddings have dropped and so has the scale of celebration. Events like sangeet, mehendi, and cocktail parties are being avoided.

Is it easier working with smaller groups?
With social distancing becoming the norm, weddings became smaller and more intimate. Earlier, the couple and families would mostly deal with the guests, giving us very little time to capture moments. Plus there’d be people everywhere, creating obstacles for us cameramen. Now, with smaller crowds, we have a lot of space for the mandap. We can instantly reach any corner and can shoot accurately at any angle we want.

Do you think this trend should stay?
I’d love it if this trend stays, as I enjoy weddings with a minimal crowd. We get a lot of room to perform creative things and interact with the couple and their families to capture their stories.

What about the pricing?
With it all becoming more intimate, the number of events have reduced, and hence we require less crew, too. So that’s no problem. 

What protective gear are you wearing and how comfortable are you with it while working?
As our services are contactless, we aren’t using any PPE kits. But to limit risk and ensure safety, we are maintaining all necessary precautions like disinfecting our gear, wearing masks, gloves and sanitising ourselves frequently.

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season?
Most weddings are rescheduled to the last half of 2020 or the beginning of 2021. Ever since the lockdown has ended, wedding enquiries have begun. We are almost booked for five weddings in August, and enquiries are going on for November and December.

What’s your sentiment about working like this?
Usually, it’s a pre- or post-wedding couple shoot that completes the entire wedding feel, as it‘s the best way for me to know the couple. It involves travel, exploring new destinations, nature and witty conversations with them. Due to the pandemic, many couples aren’t displaying any interest in these couple shoots, and I miss that a lot.


Varun Chakkilam

Varun Chakkilam

Catering to the youthful and stylish vibe, Varun Chakkilam is a fashion designer known for his trendy, vivacious designs. Thanks to his colour palette and silhouettes, his target clientele includes people with varied tastes from different walks of life. Here’s how the pandemic has changed his field of work. 

What’s your view on the coordinated masks and wedding outfits? 
The pandemic has paved the way for many changes. Brides are looking forward to wearing them for the festivities. These masks will be fashionable yet let a bride express herself. It will soon be a fun accessory to match your lehenga or coordinate with the groom.

As a fashion designer, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
Weddings will be very different this year amid Covid-19. The shift from grandeur to safety has changed the look of post-lockdown weddings. But people still prefer wearing good clothes and couture, but couture that can be re-used, rather than wearing it just once.

Do you think smaller affairs should stay?
A society that pulls out all the stops to celebrate a marriage is now trying to adapt to intimate ceremonies and virtual shows. Indian weddings are all about emotions and one can never experience them virtually. Time will tell if Indians will embrace the new normal when it comes to celebrations. 

Has is affected your pricing?
With the economic downturn, market trends and consumer behaviour have changed. The pricing has to be reworked as there are no lavish weddings. Brides now prefer wearing something that is responsibly made and can be repeated. They want the value – be it the money or the outfit.

What protective measures are you taking during your fittings, etc?
We have revised the safety measures of sanitization, both at our store and workplace. We allow customers to try on the outfits, but the clothes are then kept in a box for 24 hours and then sanitised. We encourage virtual shopping experiences for clients who cannot make it to the store.

What is your personal sentiment about working like this?
Working during this pandemic has slowed down the process, and delay in production has been a major issue. Not knowing/the uncertainty has revised our total planning. But it feels that this is the new normalcy and we have to adapt it.

What do you think the future will be like for your industry if the virus is still around?
The whole perspective of buying has changed. Functions have been reduced, due to which buying has reduced. Customers still prefer buying and wearing good outfits, but now they want to invest in timeless pieces that they can reuse, as no one is meeting too many people in one go.


Sangeeta Gupta and Priyanka Agarwal

Sangeeta Gupta and Priyanka Agarwal

Owners of the jewellery brand Sarafa, Priyanka Agarwal and Sangeeta Gupta are known to create reusable and essential jewellery. With their strength being customisation down to the minute detail, their work thrives on the trust factor. Now working from home, the two ladies are in touch with each of their clients, and manage to get their work done without requiring clients to physically come to meet them. 

What changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
With the way the current scene is, the trend has moved on to essentials and everyday wear over seasonal or intricate jewellery pieces. 

Is it easier working with smaller groups?
It comes with its own advantages. We are able to give more time to each of our clients, and are also able to maintain better focus on the orders.

Do you think this trend should stay?
We have always promoted daily/reusable and essential jewellery. We want our clients to wear their pieces instead of storing them in their lockers for long durations. So… yes!

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with the pricing? 
Sales have gone down, but it’s only temporary. In a country like ours, apart from the aesthetic value, jewellery is also seen as a solid long-term investment. People will figure out their lives in the post-COVID-19 world and work around it. We are confident of that.

How safe do you feel, getting out to work?
The current situation, fuelled by social media, has made us quite wary of it;it plays on our minds. However, the nature and style of our work doesn’t get us out as much, and a lot of our work happens over the phone without physical contact. 

How much have your sales been affected?
Since our emphasis has been on sustainable jewellery, with the number of weddings and the functions becoming fewer, we still have enough demand. Yes, weddings have been toned down and so have the jewellery orders, but we haven’t seen significant drops in sales.


Dj Abhijit

Dj Abhijit

Reflecting his personality through his music, DJ Abhijit is flamboyant, but quite serious about technicalities. With his strong basics, he tries to inject as many creative techniques on the fly, to ensure that no two performances of his sound the same. Known for his video DJing, he’s extremely well-known on the wedding circuit, for not just his performances but also his remixes.

As a DJ, what changes do you see in the current wedding scene?
First, with the mandatory restrictions in place about the number of guests allowed, there is a scaling down on the number of add-ons like decorations from the entrance to the venue, or bigger spaces. The whole idea of the “Big Fat Indian Wedding” is not a thing for some time to come.

How’s is working with smaller groups?
Working with a group of people of any size, today, will be very different from what it used to be. Not just the official rules, but people themselves will be a little apprehensive, which changes the dynamics of an event.

With the scales becoming smaller, how are you dealing with the pricing?
I understand the situation, and I have been trying my best to work on pricing that is mutually beneficial for all parties involved, without compromising on the quality of the experience.

What protective gear do you wear and how comfortable are you with it while working?
Since I take every possible precaution and have a backup plan for every eventuality, I try to make it as safe as possible for myself as well as the clients. I wear a mask, carry sanitiser on me at all times, and refrain from physical contact unless absolutely necessary.

How booked are you for the upcoming wedding season? 
I have a decently busy schedule, but not as busy as before. That’s for sure.

Have you reduced the number of weddings you’d otherwise take on, for the sake of safety?
My safety is as important as the client’s. That’s why there have been times when I have turned down weddings if the necessary arrangements weren’t meeting the safety standards.