A Successful Decade - Regina Cassandra

Regina  Cassandra Cover

She exudes elegance and intellect and is everything we’d expect someone of her stature to be—humble, vivacious, and witty. Regina Cassandra has been around in the film industry for over a decade and has many successes to her name. This week we caught up with the diva to get to know her a little better. Here’s what she had to say.

You’ve been a part of the film industry for almost a decade. What was the turning point in your career?
Yes I have been part of the industry for a decade now and while there were several important points, I wouldn’t call any a ‘turning point’. For me the turning point would be the day I decided to take up acting as a career, because I’ve been acting ever since I was a kid. It was, however, only after I finished college that I decided to take it up professionally. Previously I would only take it up as a passion or a one off summer job.

Is shuffling between the Telugu and Tamil film industries difficult? Which do you enjoy most?
Not at all… the only difference is the language. Tamil is very close to my heart because that’s where I come from. Each Tamil film I do is bigger and better than my previous one. The Telugu industry on the other hand is what made me who I am today—the Regina Cassandra that you know of. So, both of them have a very special place in my heart. Having said that, every time I work on a film I give it my all no matter what the language is.

A blast from the past—tell us how you got into filmdom.
I was always a part of films in some way or the other. I did my first ad film when I was in the fourth standard and you can say there was no looking back ever since. I did short films, ad campaigns etc…everything other than ramp walk. And I enjoyed my time in front of the camera, donning different roles. But I was very passionate about Psychology so my mom told me that I could do whatever I wanted in life but I should at least be a graduate. I kind of liked the idea too so I went ahead and completed my graduation. I then decided that since I gave Psychology three years of my life I could probably take a year off and try my hand at acting and if it worked, great, if not I would go back to Psychology.

Tell us about your ongoing projects.
I have quite a few ongoing projects—May 12 will see the release of one of my Tamil projects called SaravananIrukka Bayamaen and there’s another one titled Gemini Ganeshanum Suruli Raajanum that’s releasing towards the end of May. Then theres another film with Rana, it’s a bilingual and is called 1945 in Telugu and Madai Thirandhu in Tamil. Apart from this there’s Nakshathram in Telugu and some others in both Tamil and Telugu.

Which was your most memorable movie?
I really liked Jyo Achyutananda because of the kind of role I got to play in it. Another one close to my heart is Nenjam Marappathillai with Selvaraghavan sir…it’s a totally different character that I play in this so I’m really looking forward to it.

Who’s your favourite co-star yet?
Everyone I’ve had the opportunity to work with has been great. I’ve had amazing co-stars throughout and fortunately I’ve never had a bad experience of any sort. It feels good when you work with such amazing people.

You’ve worked with Sai Dharam Tej several times. How is it to be working with him?
Working with Tej has been great…we’ve done two films together and the funny part is that in our first film, Pilla Nuvvu Leni Jeevitam, we never said more than a ‘hi’ and ‘how are you’? We’d talk very little through the day, but it was only while working on our second film, Subramanyam For Sale, that we got close as friends because we used to hang out together. He’s an amazing human being, very talented, and hard working; he’s got a great future ahead of him.

What do you do when you’re not working?
I’m either just working out or watching a movie on Netflix or eating and sometimes even just being lazy and doing nothing...

What’s your take on art?
There are two ways of looking at art—a person who understands art has a different perspective when compared to someone who doesn’t understand it but likes it nonetheless. Having said that, art is something we all admire, whether we understand the deeper meaning of it or not.

And you’re personal style?
I definitely go for comfort over style. I need to be able to sit, stand, walk, and sometimes even run in it and yet be comfortable. I prefer to keep it simple and fuss free.     --- as told to Niharika