The Secrets of Success

The Secrets of Success

If you’ve ever run a business or helped start a company, you know what tough work it is. Shouldering the responsibility that comes with the boss’ chair is a task even Atlas wouldn’t envy, but the rewards that await those who persist make the sacrifices and travails worthwhile. Of course, it’s not easy to get across the line without considering a number of factors, and your own personal well-being must be one of them. Allowing yourself to suffer needlessly for the sake of financial success or fame isn’t advisable, and it need not even be on the agenda at all. It just takes is a little bit of time and conscious effort. Here are some tips to stay on the right track for long-term success.
 
Don’t sweat the small stuff: Starting a new business or taking over the reins of an existing one comes with its own challenges and difficulties. Why make life even harder by worrying over the things that don’t matter, or the things you shouldn’t worry about? You can’t put financial worries to one side, so at least let go of things like the idiot who cuts you off in traffic. Even small pet peeves can add unneeded stress to an already hectic situation.
 
The Secrets of Success 
 
Don’t keep sweating: Delegating responsibility is one of the first things any entrepreneur worth his salt should learn to do. Micromanagement might give you a rush of control and bring on waves of confidence, but it’s unrealistic to expect that you can or will reach the end of the rainbow without letting go of some degree of control. There’s nothing more annoying than holding onto all the power in your organisation, realising you’ve made a mistake only after crossing the point of no return.
 
Do what you like: Every now and then, you need to take some time to do things you enjoy and that have nothing to do with work. It helps to just forget about that contract the client needs to sign and go for a bike ride, build a model airplane, or play a game of football with your kids. There’s not a lot of spare time to be had when you’re an entrepreneur in the nascent stages of a venture, so make sure to extract maximum benefit from your ‘me’ time.
 
Do the things you have to: Looking after your physical health is vital. If a round of golf is what helps ensure your emotional well-being, it’s just as important that you exercise, eat well and get adequate sleep. You’re no good to your clients or your employees if you show up to work bleary-eyed and able to work only after you’ve had three cups of coffee. And few things are more distracting than having to put lots of meetings on hold because of doctor’s appointments.
 
The Secrets of Success 
 
Learn to say ‘no’: There are going to be instances when you have to turn someone down in order to ensure long-term benefit. This might mean passing up on a lucrative deal or hotshot client, or having to turn down an employee’s unreasonable request for leave or a pay rise. Being soft and caving will spell doom for your venture, for your reputation as an able and self-confident manager, and for the company’s ability to let go of possibly over-demanding and difficult clients. All of these cause headaches.
 
Learn to ask for (and accept) help: Along with delegating responsibility, one of the hallmarks of any successful businessperson is that he knows when he’s out of his depth. Furthermore, he accepts the opinions and advice of those who know better. That’s not to say that you can leave everything to the consultants. As the head of the organisation, you still have to assess the advice you’re given and make the best possible decision. But it doesn’t hurt to have some expert input on which to base that decision.
 
Pay attention to the lessons: They say those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it, so be sure that your mistakes and errors don’t go in vain. Of course you’ll mess up at one point or another; these can be lessons or the first of several bad decisions that will follow. It all depends on whether or not you learn what went wrong, and work to see that it doesn’t happen again.